NURSE LINE FAQs

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STREP THROAT

 

SYMPTOMS

  • Rapid onset

  • Pain with swallowing

  • Fever

  • Red and swollen tonsils

  • Swollen lymph nodes

DO NOT INCLUDE:

  • Cough

  • Runny nose

  • Hoarseness

  • Pink eye

HOME CARE

  • Give acetaminophen or ibuprofen for fever or severe throat discomfort*

  • Push fluids and soft foods (ex. cold drinks and milk shakes)

SORE THROAT RELIEF

OLDER THAN A YEAR:

Sip warm fluids

Give a spoonful of honey

OLDER THAN 8 YEARS:

Gargle using warm water and table salt.

*See dosing chart below

COME IN IF

  • Sore throat pain is severe and not improving after 2 hours of pain medication

  • Your child is younger than 2 years old

  • A widespread rash develops

  • An earache or sinus pain develop with a fever

  • You call and a medical assistant recommends a visit

INFLUENZA

 

SOURCES: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION & "PEDIATRIC TELEPHONE PROTOCOLS" BY BARTON D. SCHMITT, M.D., F.A.A.P. 

SYMPTOMS

  • Fever or chills

  • Cough

  • Sore throat

  • Runny or stuffy nose

  • Muscle or body aches

  • Headaches

  • Fatigue

  • Vomiting or diarrhea

HOME CARE

  • Gently suction or blow nose to remove nasal discharge

  • Push fluids

  • Use a humidifier

  • For fevers above 102 degrees or pain relief, use acetaminophen or ibuprofen*

*See dosing chart below

COME IN IF

  • Child exhibits difficulty breathing, retractions, wheezing, or rapid breathing

  • Dehydration is suspected

  • Child develops an earache, sinus pain, or sore throat

  • Fever lasts longer than 3 days

  • You call and a medical assistant recommends a visit

PINK EYE (CONJUNCTIVITIS)

 

SYMPTOMS

  • Pink or red color in the white of the eyes

  • Swelling

  • Increased tears

  • Itching, irritation, burning

  • Discharge (pus or mucus)

  • Crusting of eyelids or lashes

  • Feeling that there is something in the eye

HOME CARE

  • Cleanse eyelids with warm water and a clean cotton ball

  • Use artificial tears

  • Remove contact lenses

COME IN IF

  • Outer eyelid is very red

  • Eye is swollen or painful

  • There is constant tearing or blinking

  • Child's vision is blurring

  • Child is sensitive to light

  • You call and a medical assistant recommends a visit

RSV

 

SYMPTOMS

  • Runny nose

  • Decrease in appetite

  • Coughing

  • Sneezing

  • Fever

  • Wheezing or apnea

HOME CARE

  • Manage fever and pain with acetaminophen or ibuprofen*

  • Push fluids

  • Remove contact lenses

  • Use a humidifier

*See dosing chart below

COME IN IF

  •  Child has difficulty breathing

  • Child is considered high-risk

  • Ribs are pulling in with each breath (retractions)

  • Child exhibits severe wheezing or rapid breathing

  • Lips or face are bluish 

  • You call and a medical assistant recommends a visit

FEVER

 

FACTS

  • Fevers are a temperature of 100.4 F or higher

  • Temperatures below 100.4 F are normal

  • Fevers are harmless and often helpful

  • Fevers help the body fight infection

  • Fevers of 100.4 - 102 F are low grade fevers.

  • Fevers of 104 F or higher are high fevers. They are not harmful, even though they are called "high"

COME IN IF

  • Fever is higher than 105 F

  • Child exhibits shaking chills

  • Pain is suspected (frequent crying)

  • Child is 3-6 months with a fever higher than 102 F or with a low fever combined with other symptoms

  • Child is 6-24 months with a fever higher than 102 F for over 24 hours with no other symptoms

  • You call and a medical assistant recommends a visit

HOME CARE

  • Fevers only need to be treated if they cause discomfort, which does not usually occur until they are above 103 F. 

  • Start medication for fevers higher than 102 F. 

  • Treat fevers with one medication. Either acetaminophen or ibuprofen (See medication charts below for dosing information). It is often unnecessary to alternate medicaitons; remember, they help the body fight infection.

  • With medication, most fevers come down about 2 degrees F. They do not usually go back down to normal. When the medication wears off, the fever often returns. This is normal.

  • If your child's doctor tells you to treat fevers differently, follow their advice. 

OUR MEDICAL ASSISTANTS ARE HAPPY TO ASSIST YOU WITH ANY QUESTIONS!

SOURCES: THE CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION & "PEDIATRIC TELEPHONE PROTOCOLS" BY BARTON SCHMITT, M.D., F.A.A.P.

MEDICATION DOSING CHARTS

 
REMEMBER TO Read and follow the label on all MOTRIN products Take every 6-8 hours as neede

OUR MEDICAL ASSISTANTS ARE HAPPY TO ASSIST YOU WITH ANY QUESTIONS!